Full of Beans

Fizzle Bodner came knees and elbows through the canes down to the creek where we were poling our half-drums up and down the tributaries of the Amazon.  We aimed our rifles and shot him down.

“Huh!  I ain’t goin’ to fall in this mud.  Anyway, you ought to come up to Miz Blake’s.  She’s got a lottery.”

We poled the tubs over to the planks we called a dock.

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Mayfair Burning

It was the Great Depression, and we, like all our neighbors, were forever short of cash money.  It was pinto beans and mashed potatoes all week, and on Sunday stringy meat which made my teeth shift in my gums.  It was burnt bacon and pan biscuits for my father’s breakfast, and flour gravy over biscuits for ours.  Mother did the best she could, and our clothes were well mended but faded from many boiling washtubs.  Old Mrs. Reiner delivered the milk in quart mason jars. She wore knee-high rubber boots and pulled a child’s wagon from her farm a mile up the clay road.

 By the time I was ten, my brother seven, and our sister five, we were sent away on Saturday afternoons to see a double feature movie, a couple of cartoons, and a Batman serial.  We were given eleven cents each for the tickets, and an extra nickel for sweets. Five cents went nowhere at the concession inside the theater, whereas at one of the grocery stores along the way a penny would buy enough whip licorice in red and black to make a cat-o’-nine-tails, a roll of candy coins in all flavors, and little peppery hearts for Sue.

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Conversation about Meeting Donna

Here’s a transcription of a conversation between Patrick and JP on 16 Nov 2011 at a restaurant. The audio file is too large to post on this site. If there’s interest I’ll see about adding it to YouTube.

JD: Well Donna was seventeen, right? I think, she went to school …

PM: When was she born? I don’t know.

JP: I think she was born in ’38 which would make her 16. Continue reading “Conversation about Meeting Donna”